To Photo metric, or not to Photo metric

To Photo metric, or not to Photo metric

Revit’s default light sources work. Most of the time though, these default or standard light source definitions will not create an acceptable diffusion of light within a room. We will investigate what results can be achieved between a default light source, and a photo metric light source in Revit.

1.1 Standard Light Source definition

Standard Light Source definition
Standard Light Source definition

1.2 Rendered Result

Rendered Result
Rendered Result

2.1 Photo metric Light Source definition

Photometric Light Source definition
Photometric Light Source definition

2.2 Rendered Result

Rendered Result
Rendered Result

There are pro’s and con’s with both light sources: 

  • Standard Light Sources:
    • Pro: Lighter in size in terms of the data it contains.
    • Pro: Renders are completed faster due to the above.
    • Con: Renders might not be an accurate representation of the actual light diffusion.
  • Photo metric Light Sources: 
    • Pro: Actual diffusion is more accurate due to the IES file attached to the light source.
    • Con: Rendering time will suffer, as there are a lot more data to process.

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Reference To Photo metric, or not to Photo metric

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Organic Architecture, Avant Garde

Organic Architecture, Avant Garde

organic architecture

Organic architecture is the new revolution to have taken over the architectural domain that marks avant-gardism in building construction. It does away with conventional geometric shapes and takes resort in free-flowing curves and natural forms.

After farming techniques went the organic way, architecture happens to follow suit. But don’t be scared of your living spaces being invaded by manure and scum. It isn’t also an anti ‘global warming’ movement to bring about a sustainable model of human existence.

Organic architecture is the new revolution to have taken over the architectural domain that marks avant-gardism in building construction. It does away with conventional geometric shapes and takes resort in free-flowing curves and natural forms.

Yesterday against Today and Tomorrow
The 20th century was marked by dominance in rectilinear and orthogonal design structures because the materialistic aspirations of the industrial age could only be fulfilled that ways. A little reflection would show how mechanical the entire process was. But, the new-age is marked by ‘a free style,’ which highlights beauty and harmony, through its curves and free-flowing forms that is more akin to the human body, mind and spirit. Such architecture enraptures the dwelling individuals and they not only feel better, but also freer and more expressive.

The Modern Manifestation
In this millennium, scientific explorations brought us a more holistic and organic picture of the universe. Thus, a craving for new forms of expression bearing semblance to nature’s diversity emerged. Buildings that resemble a breaking wave or a blooming flower will challenge the existing paradigm and sweepingly transform architecture and building design in the 21st century. The Opera House at Sydney harbor that resembles a boat’s sails and the spiral forms that resemble sea-shells at New York’s Guggenheim Museum are perfect manifestations of organic architecture.

The Driver of Change
Modern computing, information technology and the rapidly expanding computer-aided design (CAD), across all fields of architectural design, have helped architects in giving shape to their creative process. The latest three-dimensional BIM softwares have made it a breeze to design complex and sophisticated building structures. Curved forms like arches, domes, vaults, and spheres are not only stronger, but also more efficient and economical than their rectilinear counterparts. The radical transformation in building design is also putting a simultaneous ripple-effect on other design fields like furniture, lighting, textile design, landscape and interior design.

A Natural Art Form
Organic architecture puts a building in a continuous logarithmic spiral where open-space platforms are suspended from a central mast by cables. The spaces appear to float over each other as if defying gravity. Inspired by the natural symmetry and non-linearity found in nature and organisms, organic architecture is characterized by visual poetry and idiosyncrasy. And in tune, it embodies a harmony of person, place, and materials. 

Organic architecture oozes a surreal free-spirit and is surprising due to its multiple facets. A break-off from static symmetry for embracing the dynamic irregularities found in Nature. Reference architectural evangelist.

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Flexible Ducting Graphics

Flexible Ducting Graphics

By default, we have eight graphical ways to show flexible ducting in Revit. We can either decide to use one graphic for all flexible ducting, or decide to use a specific graphic to distinguish between for example, Standard Flexible Ducting, Insulated Flexible Ducting, etc.

The images below will show what the graphics look like per flex duct instance property.

1. Flex Pattern: Single Line

Single Line
Single Line

2. Flex Pattern: Circle

Circle
Circle

3. Flex Pattern: Oval

Oval
Oval

4. Flex Pattern: Flex

Flex
Flex

5. Flex Pattern: Flex 2

Flex 2
Flex 2

6. Flex Pattern: Curve

Curve
Curve

 7. Flex Pattern: Single Line 45

Single Line 45
Single Line 45

 8. Flex Pattern: Undefined

Undefined
Undefined

Reference  Flexible Ducting Graphics by Herman Solomon.

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Can I get a witness? Autodesk to testify in Washington

Can I get a witness? Autodesk to testify in Washington

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National leaders look to Autodesk Construction team for support and testimony

In just a few days, our very own Stacy Scopano, Sr. Industry Manager, Building Construction, will meet with members of the National Institute of Building Sciences (or NIBS as those in the know like to say).

The hearing, which is being sponsored by Autodesk and supported by the International Code Council, will provide an opportunity for project stakeholders from the planning, design, construction, operations, ownership, and other segments of the U.S. building industry to speak about the productivity and workforce challenges they face and offer potential solutions.

Building momentum

Autodesk’s involvement at the hearing came at the direct request of Ryan Colker, President Barack Obama’s Construction Advisor. Ryan and Stacy both serve on the Board of Directors for the NIBS Offsite Construction Council. Our participation ties in nicely with our overarching thought leadership efforts. Earlier in the year Stacy and colleagues on the construction marketing team helped to draft a survey that drove the publication of the well-received Economist report “Rethinking productivity across the construction industry: The challenge of change.”

To find out more about the NIBS hearing or read about the Off-site Construction Council visit the NIBS home page, or clickhere to read the Economist report. Reference Can I get a witness? Autodesk to testify in Washington by  Julie Jacobson.

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Model Compare

Model Compare

I have recently been asked by a client for the ability to compare different versions of the same model. When I was asked to do this I scratched my head ans said “Oookkk” not really know why and how I was going to do this.

When I started this I asked myself, why would we want to compare models?
-To show the power of BIM. (vague but an answer)
-To see what objects had been deleted in the model (getting a little more to the point)
-To see what objects had changed in the model (getting a little more to the point)
-To see what objects were new in the model (getting a little more to the point)
-To see if the model is following the office standards (Using compare to help with model QC, hmm)

In my research I came across this article written by David light. In this article he wrote back in 2009 he explained different ways to compare models. David talked about using the Autodesk Revit Model Compare add in tool, as well as using Autodesk’s Design Review, and using Adobe Acrobat. Even though the article was written about 6 years ago it is still applicable today in 2015, but now there are a few more process as well.  Today we can use Navis Works to compare models. See Navis works link to see how to do it. The Cad Technology Center (CTC) has a model compare tool which I recently talked a little about. CTC Revit Express Tools:Model Compare

Using Autodesk Design Review, Adobe Acrobat Pro, and or Blue Beam Revu all works the same way. These programs really aren’t comparing models they are comparing two different 2d documents. Don’t think I’m belittling this at all. Comparing the 2d information is extremely import. Having a program highlight and show you what has changed between different versions of the same documents saves a lot of time in finding the changes, good or bad.

Model Compare

CTC’s Model Compare and the Autodesk Model Compare tools are similar in how they work. Both programs look at the databases of multiple models and look for items that are different. CTC’s Model Compare takes a snapshot of the Revit Data base and puts it into a small XML like file, while Autodesk’s Model Compare requires you to open both version of the model to compare the models. Both the CTC and Autodesk Model Compare addin’s create reports that can be brought into Excel. These data centric reports have a lot of information, and generally a lot more information than I would generally use.

Model Compare

Within Navisworks there are two workflows to compare the models. The first method is to use the model compare function within Navis works that works like comparing 2d PDF’s,see  this Navis works link to see how to do it.. The other method is to overlay multiple models on top of one anther. One of the benefits of Navis works is that you can insert multiple files into the same Navis works project. This functionality allows you to insert different version of a model and overlay the models to see the difference graphically. One the different models are in the Navis works project you can change the color of an entire inserted model, not just individual modeled objects. This workflow of overlaying the models I got from one of the engineers I work with at Bridger & Paxton consulting Engineers, who knows Navis works a hole heck of a lot better then I do. Reference Model Compare by  Mathew Miller.

Model Compare

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BIM 360 info & Autodesk 360 Viewer

BIM 360 info & Autodesk 360 Viewer

A sneak peek at the new Autodesk 360 viewer

For those of you who have signed up for the Autodesk 360 Technical Preview, you may well have already gotten a taste for its new viewing capability. Upload a 3D model of pretty much any format (the list is pretty exhaustive and goes well beyond Autodesk’s own formats, but you might try with DWG, RVT, IAM, IPT, NWD and DWF, to name a few to get you started) and you’ll see the viewer enabled for that model:

Autodesk 360

Before we go on, please bear in mind that this is very much still in Beta: it’s early days and the team is ironing out wrinkles on a regular basis. You’ll also need a WebGL-enabled browser to make this work, of course (as mentioned in yesterday’s post, this is built using Three.js which in turn uses WebGL). With all that said, hopefully you’ll see that this technology is pretty darn cool.

One other thing, be sure to read up about the new Autodesk 360 viewer at Ken Walmsley’s Through the Interface blog. I’ve had a good play with this & its very impressive.

BIM 360 info & Autodesk 360 Viewer

BIM 360 info & Autodesk 360 Viewer

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Our Mission: To offer the best integration of Architecture and Engineering solutions thereby consistently being in focus of what the clients need. Our zeal to excel in the technology inputs and providing consistently credible output shall be the strong points of our services at all times.

Our Vision: To be a forerunner in our field with the drive to provide valuable services to the clients. To be part of the solutions through sustainable engineering and architectural designs that keep in mind the future. To be quality driven in our approach to cater to our clients with emphasis on balancing their needs and the environment.

Modeling Methods versus Project File Size

Modeling Methods versus Project File Size

In-place models do have it’s place in Revit. However, the overuse of in-place models will have a detrimental effect on your overall project file size, as well as the performance of your hardware.

Often times users create in-place models due to time constraints or to better visualize the object in the project context. There is nothing wrong with that. However, where the problem starts to rear its head, is when one forgets to convert the in-place model to a family after the design has been finalized. 

I often tell my students: Rather try and do things properly from the start, than trying to reverse engineer a model when you desperately need to get your CD’s out. 

To demonstrate this, I have created two scenarios where the contribution to file size is compared between an in-place model and a family.

The first comparison uses a 2.5 m x 2.5 m x 2.5 m Cube.

Modeling Methods

Now, in the example above, there does not seem to be a big difference between a Revit family and an in-place model. Remember though: a cube is not a complex piece of geometry. There isn’t that much data for Revit to process.

The second comparison will use one of each available forms in Revit: Extrusion, Blend, Revolve, Sweep and Swept Blend.

Modeling Methods

The more complex geometry data Revit needs to process, the higher the project file size will become. In the last scenario, there is a 54.3 MB difference between the Revit family and in-place model. Reference by Herman Solomon.

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Upcoming Webcast: From Paper to Cloud: A Lean Construction Case Study Featuring Whiting-Turner

Upcoming Webcast: From Paper to Cloud: A Lean Construction Case Study Featuring Whiting-Turner

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Making the step to deploying Lean for your production planning process is a major undertaking. Once you have made the transition to leveraging the Last Planner methodology to manage the tasks, commitments and dependencies during your planning meetings, you need an efficient way to capture, manage, visualize and collaborate against the data you collect. While spread sheets and sticky notes are the current standard, cloud and mobile technology like BIM 360 Plan reduce the manual data entry process while automatically collecting and articulating productivity reports for process improvement.

Join PhoenixEOS, BIM and Autodesk Lean Construction Specialist, Project Manager at PhoenixEOS, to learn about their journey to improve their production planning process. You’ll hear how they were able to:

  • Replace traditional reactive scheduling methods with a proactive one that is supported by the agility of robust software and daily check-ins.
  • Integrate the master schedule and production management processes.
  • Create a collaborative planning environment.
  • Use metrics and standard processes to drive continuous improvement and accountability. Reference Upcoming Webcast: From Paper to Cloud: A Lean Construction Case Study Featuring Whiting-Turner by Julie Jacobson.

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Formit – Conceptual BIM

Formit – Conceptual BIM

I recently watched a video on Autodesk University Online called AB6516: Take a Deep Dive into Conceptual BIM. This was a good over view of what Formit can do. This was a round table discussion class taught by Tom Vollaro, Sean Burke, Ryan Cameron, and Anthony Caputo. In their presentation they did a great job explaining how they use Formit on a daily basis. I though the presentation was short, but it showed a lot. On a side note I like how AU Online has changed this year. I really hope it sticks. It looks like you can now watch any of the video, and you only need an AU account to download the handouts, or to download the video. Yes I said download the Video this years it looks like they gave us back the ability to download videos yeah.

Formit - Conceptual BIM

Formit is a conceptual modeler much like Sketchup. Biggest difference is that it was initially designed for the iPad, they have since come out with a Android and Web version. (I wish they had a Windows tablet version that could be used like the iPad, and Android versions.) Another difference is that it creates native Revit files. There is a workflow to bring Revit files back into Formit but that seems really convoluted. To use take a Revit file back into Formit you will need theRevit to Formit converter tool, the problem with this add-in it’s for Revit 2015 not 2016. (Autodesk has been really slow this year in updating their Add-in for Revit)

Formit - Conceptual BIM

I first learned about Formit 2 years ago, and it has evolved a lot since then. At the time I was looking for a way to do Sketch up on my iPad, and this was the solution. Since then Autodesk has added some energy analysis tools. Now like Sketch up there is a paid and free version, the free version gives me every thing I need, but the paid version gives the ability to do the energy analysis, and some collaboration tools. (One thing that would be nice would be to role Formit into the Building Design Suite.). Reference Formit – Conceptual BIM by Mathew Miller.

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Autodesk 3ds team looking for Revit Users interested or using 3ds Max Design for visualizing Projects!

Autodesk 3ds team looking for Revit Users interested or using 3ds Max Design for visualizing Projects!

Autodesk 3ds

Autodesk M&E 3ds Max Gunslinger summit is a design-focused participatory event in Montreal (Canada) between our users and members of the Autodesk 3ds Max product management, development and design teams. The event is comprised of a series of workshops, design reviews, validation discussions, design charrettes, and more.

3ds Max and 3ds Max Design tools and technology have been used by visualization experts to tell the story of a design in dynamic presentations and won many awards in the entertainment industry.   Clients consistently respond to exploring their project or product in context, within their existing surroundings and bustling with life.  They, and other stakeholders, also find that video helps them understand complex information about the design.   This could be anything from construction logistics, complex function (such as a sliding roof), the impact of design options, or visualization of traffic, weather, stress, airflow and energy.    Cinematic storytelling techniques can convincingly evoke emotions and convey these messages with style.   Unfortunately, in the past, you’d need a large budget to deliver presentations that include these elements.   There are many ways to solve these issues but your feedback is essential.  This is why we’d like to meet with you in person.

We are looking to locate people who would be interested or available in attending.   The Gunslinger is by invitation only as we can only accommodate so many, and other than travel, all shuttles, hotel, and meals are included by Autodesk.   The meeting would be 4 days, Sept 16-19.    It is an opportunity to meet our team and influence tools that could help you improve the way you communicate your designs.  

If you are interested in the Gunslinger please let us know by completing a short survey.  We will then be reviewing the submissions for selecting users but if you are unable to attend this specific Gunslinger but are interested in future events please do fill out the survey. Reference by  David Light.

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