WHEN COLLABORATIVE WORKSPACE MEETS GOVERNMENT OFFICE

WHEN COLLABORATIVE WORKSPACE MEETS GOVERNMENT OFFICE

WHEN COLLABORATIVE WORKSPACE MEETS GOVERNMENT OFFICE

WHEN COLLABORATIVE WORKSPACE MEETS GOVERNMENT OFFICE

What comes to mind when you picture a government office? People wearing gray suits, toiling away behind a cubicle desk stacked high with paperwork? In actuality, the government workplace is undergoing a huge shift, embracing collaboration through design and tearing down the cubicle walls to be more flexible, open, and forward-thinking.

While many companies in other industries have already shifted to a more open, collaborative workspace, government offices are just starting to embrace this design change. Workplaces across industries are moving to open office layouts to foster teamwork and creativity, bringing employees together in frequent collaboration. They find that open offices can promote greater health, happiness, and productivity for employees by providing more access to natural light and varied working environments that encourage employees to move throughout the day. Further, open workspaces can reduce real estate costs, which is welcome in any industry — private or public. While redesigning a workspace can be a large financial investment, it’s one that pays off in re-orienting both the physical environment and work culture toward more collaborative and healthy ways of working.

WHEN COLLABORATIVE WORKSPACE MEETS GOVERNMENT OFFICE

The City of Boston was presented with the opportunity to rethink the office space ofBoston Public Schools (BPS) — the oldest school department in the country — as they relocated and centralized departments within a new building in Dudley Square, a streetcar neighborhood that thrived in the early twentieth century with retail stores like the iconic Ferdinand, New England’s largest furniture retailer of its time. The neighborhood was challenged by disinvestment in the 1980s after losing residents and businesses to the suburbs. Under the late Mayor Thomas M. Menino, the City’s Dudley Square Vision Project was launched to revive the community. In this effort, the city commissioned the new BPS headquarters, a design by Mecanoo Architecten and Sasaki Associates; the newly renamed Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building was built in collaboration with Shawmut Construction, PMA Consultants, Boston’s Property and Construction Management Department (PCMD), the Boston Redevelopment Authority(BRA), and the City of Boston. Copied from work design magazine.

For more information about it then contact us here.

Click here to see our all services related it.

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *